Canna ‘Trinacria’


A very tall Italian Group cultivar; light green foliage, large, oval shaped, branching habit; panicles of flowers are open, self-coloured sulphur-yellow, throat pearl, staminodes are large, labellum is sulphur-yellow, stamen is sulphur-yellow, style is sulphur-yellow, petals green, fully self-cleaning, good bloomer; seed is sterile, pollen is low fertile; rhizomes are long and thin, coloured white; tillering is prolific.
Introduced by C. Sprenger, Dammann & Co., Naples, Italy, EU. Flowers show their C. flaccida heritage, they are very thin and fade very quickly, but while they are young they are an absolute delight. There is a faint lighter marking running from the throat up to the middle of some petals.
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Canna ‘Tivoli’


A tall Australian Group cultivar; green foliage, large, lanceolate shaped, upright habit; spikes of flowers are pendulous, deep-pink with a wide ivory margin, staminodes are medium size, edges irregular, petals yellow, fully self-cleaning, good bloomer, blooms open in the evening; fertile both ways, not self-pollinating or true to type, capsules globose; rhizomes are thick, up to 3 cm in diameter, coloured white and pink; tillering is average. Introduced by Bernard Yorke, Queensland, Australia in 2008.
When writing, Bernard explained that plants of Tivoli are quite tall, (nearly 6ft) and leaves are obviously related to the pollen parent in that they are long green and quite pointed. However, the plants make a good sized clump quite quickly with foliage all pointing upwards. The rhizomes are not creeping like the pollen parent. Flowers are somewhat pendulous but nicely variegated. C. heliconifolia(Omega) is the pollen parent, “I have had some successes with using a species type as one of the parent plants, but a lot of ‘trashy’ ones can result before getting the special ones I am after.”
“We are now approaching winter in Queensland, and with a lot of recent heavy rain, rhizomes are already showing new growth from the base, and I haven’t yet cut them back to give the plants a rest for our short winter. I still have a moderate show of flowers in the garden, but as I said earlier, our winters are usually short lived, but with climate change, nothing is the norm any more.”


Cannas by Bernard Yorke

Canna ‘Trent’


A medium sized aquatic cultivar, equally at home as a water marginal or in the border; glaucous green foliage, lanceolate shaped, upright habit; flowers are open, self-coloured sulphur-yellow, staminodes are long and narrow, edges irregular, labellum is burnt-red with a wide sulphur-yellow margin, stamen is burnt-red, style is sulphur-yellow, petals yellow, fully self-cleaning, good bloomer; fertile both ways, self-pollinating but not true to type, capsules globose; rhizomes are long and thin, coloured white; tillering is average.
Introduced by Malcolm Dalebö, Claines Canna Collection, Worcester, England, EU in 2007. The breeding is Canna ‘Endeavor’ x C. ‘Thames’.
The Claines Canna Aquatics have been bred to populate garden ponds that are just a few metres square, compared with the much larger Longwood Aquatics destined for huge ponds and lakes.

Canna ‘Torchlight’


A medium sized Foliage Group cultivar; green foliage, oblong shaped, branching habit; spikes of flowers are erect, red-orange and orange-yellow, staminodes are long and narrow, edges regular, fully self-cleaning; fertile both ways, not true to type, self-pollinating, capsules globose; rhizomes are thick, up to 3 cm in diameter, coloured white and purple; tillering is prolific.

Introduced by Johnny K. Johnson, USA. The breeding is C. indica x C. indica var. ‘lumbautum’

Canna ‘Topaz’


A small Premier Group cultivar; green foliage, oval shaped, branching habit; panicles of flowers are cupped, yellow-orange and apricot, staminodes are medium size, edges ruffled, fully self-cleaning, outstanding bloomer; fertile both ways, not self-pollinating or true to type, capsules globose; rhizomes are thick, up to 3 cm in diameter, coloured white; tillering is average.





Introduced by Marcelle Sheppard, Texas, USA. I believe that this is one of the great breeding Cannas, producing magnificent offspring that are all under 1 metre (3’3″) and with full, round flowers.

End of Cannas in England


Temperatures have been falling across Britain as the country prepares for a cold snap coming in from the Arctic.

Winds are becoming increasingly northerly with temperatures expected to fall to below freezing overnight across large swathes of the country.

Unseasonally cold temperatures will be accompanied by wintry showers with hail, sleet and even snow on high ground.

Temperatures, which reached a mild 16C (61F) on Monday, are due to fall a few degrees everywhere during the day.

This means the end of the Canna growing season, and the collections plants have all been making a huge effort in the last few weeks to try and produce seed before the winter frost, but their efforts have been in vain this year.

Once again, we have had a very poor year for growing Canna, the early months being almost back to front, with high sun early on and then poor light and much rain when we should have been enjoying a summer.

The whole collection has hardly produced any seed again this year, the best indicator of how the crop has progressed during the year.

We will let the frost stop the growth and over a period of about a month we will move nearly 300 Cannas indoors for winter protection. Most will be planted in the soil inside a poly-tunnel, where the addition of a layer or two of fleece covering will protect these tropical plants from our English winter. Others will be taken into a polytunnel in their pots and will remain in the pots over the winter, again protected by fleece and with thermostatically controlled heaters.

Whether planted in the soil or left in pots the plants will still require some attention, weeding and ensuring that the soil does not dry out totally, and a fungicide spray occasionally to ensure that damp related problems do not occur.

Canna lovers who have taken photos over the summer are invited to send me copies and I will be pleased to publish them on the blog, and let us all try and bring back shared memories of the summer!

Canna ‘Tirol’


A medium sized Crozy Group cultivar; dark foliage, oval shaped, upright habit; spikes of flowers are open, self-coloured salmon, staminodes are medium size, edges irregular; fertile both ways, not self-pollinating or true to type, capsules round; rhizomes are thick, up to 3 cm in diameter, coloured pink and purple; tillering is average.


Introduced by W. Pfitzer, Stadt Felbach, Stuttgart, Germany, EU in 1930. Synonym: C. ‘Tyrol’